Interesting Facts About Belly Button: It’s Your First Ever Scar

Belly Button

Belly Button

When was the last time you looked at your navel? The belly button deserves more attention thanks to all the secrets it’s hiding. Belly buttons are the wonderful birthmarks that come in different shapes. It’s a feature that characterizes us humans. People pierce the belly button to wear attractive jewelry and show their belly buttons in all their glory.
You’re getting a belly button regardless of how your birth goes, and the idea that your delivery room doctor has any influence over this is just one of the many myths surrounding pregnancy and birth. The belly button, also known as umbilicus or navel, marks the area where your umbilical cord used to be attached.
When you are in the womb, your umbilical cord attaches to your navel at one end and your placenta—a mass of blood vessels attached to the wall of your mother’s uterus—at the other. Your mother’s food and oxygen goes through her blood to the uterus where they are exchanged to your blood, which carries the nutrients from the placenta, down the umbilical cord, through your navel, and finally into your body.
Once you are born, the umbilical cord becomes useless now that your mouth, lungs, and digestive tract are functioning. The body responds to the transition by closing up the point where the umbilical cord connected to your body and created a belly button.
To free the body of the useless umbilical cord, your doctor cuts it down to a mere stub that hangs off your stomach. Within a few days to weeks, the stub will fall off as a result of the belly button naturally closing.
Did you know humans are not the only species that have belly buttons? Most other mammals that have the placenta do, though their belly buttons or navels are not as prominent as ours and are tougher to locate. Here are FIVE facts about your belly button that you probably didn’t know.
1. Some of people don’t have a belly button. This happens due to a not so common defect in the baby called umbilical hernia. In this condition, the baby’s intestines poke through the intestinal wall. It requires a surgery, leaving the baby without a belly button.
2. It’s your first ever scar. Your belly button is your first scar ever. While you were in the womb, the umbilical cord connected you and your mother’s placenta. This cord was cut when you were born. The result is a scar known as your belly button.
3. Belly button piercings can take up to six months to heal. In some cases, it may not fully heal until one year. If you decide to get your navel pierced, avoid infections by keeping it clean. Don’t overdo it, though. Follow the piercer’s instructions and practice good hygiene.
Maybe the belly button doesn’t have any purpose, but hopefully, you can appreciate it a little more! It never hurts to know more about your body.
4. It houses more than 2,000 species of bacteria. There’s a lot of bacteria living in your belly button. The dark, hidden space doubles as a great home. But this is no different than the rest of your skin! About 99.9% of these bacteria are harmless. Research proves that there are 2,368 species of bacteria swarming around in your belly button. And that’s more than twice the variety of species found in North American birds or ants.
5. It’s your energy chakra for creativity. According to Ayurveda, the sacral chakra is located in the lower belly. This is one of seven major energy points. It’s connected with your creativity, emotional well-being, and pleasures! Encouraging healthy energy flow through this chakra is important for emotional and mental health.

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