Interesting Facts About Jealousy: “Green-Eyed Monster”

Jealousy

Jealousy

Although primarily viewed as a negative and unwanted emotion, jealousy is something that all of us feel from time to time. But what is it really? Is it the feeling we get in our stomach when we are envious of something? Is it the longing to have what we cannot have?
Jealousy is an emotion; the term generally refers to the thoughts or feelings of insecurity, fear, concern, and envy over relative lack of possessions, status or something of great personal value, particularly in reference to a comparator.
Jealousy often consists of one or more of emotions such as anger, resentment, inadequacy, helplessness or disgust. In its original meaning, jealousy is distinct from envy, though the two terms have popularly become synonymous in the English language, with jealousy now also taking on the definition originally used for envy alone.
Jealousy is a typical experience in human relationships, and it has been observed in infants as young as five months. Some claim that jealousy is seen in every culture; however, others claim jealousy is a culture-specific phenomenon.
Jealousy can either be suspicious or reactive, and it is often reinforced as a series of particularly strong emotions and constructed as a universal human experience. Psychologists have proposed several models to study the processes underlying jealousy and have identified factors that result in jealousy.
Sociologists have demonstrated that cultural beliefs and values play an important role in determining what triggers jealousy and what constitutes socially acceptable expressions of jealousy. Biologists have identified factors that may unconsciously influence the expression of jealousy.
Throughout history, artists have also explored the theme of jealousy in paintings, photographs, films, plays, songs, books, and poems, and theologians have offered religious views of jealousy based on the scriptures of their respective faiths.
Here are 8 interesting facts about jealousy that may help you to make more sense of the emotion:
1. A study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, replicated jealousy studies done on humans on canines. They reported, in a paper published in PLOS ONE in 2014, that a significant number of dogs exhibited jealous behaviors when their human companions paid attention to dog-like toys, compared to when their human companions paid attention to nonsocial objects.
2. Since William Shakespeare’s use of terms like “green-eyed monster”, the color green has been associated with jealousy and envy, from which the expressions “green with envy”, are derived.
3. Jealousy occurs most often when you are unhappy with your existing situation. Consider it your subconscious way of trying to motivate you.
4. One study in particular showed no difference in amounts of jealousy between men and women. Although women get a bad reputation for being jealous, turns out men are just as bad.
5. Although you may feel like you are able to tell when your jealousy is rational or irrational, consumption of alcohol diminishes your ability to do so. Scientifically, this is not quite understood. While some emotions are only exacerbated by alcohol, jealousy is a terrible drunk and simply fires out of control.
6. Doctors and therapists all seem to agree that the best way to overcome jealousy is to be honest with yourself and others about the emotions you are experiencing. Trying to fight it by telling yourself that you don’t feel a certain way will only make things more difficult.
7. Ever had a stomach ache or been sick while feeling extremely jealous of something? Jealousy has been shown to actually have physical affects on people. It’s not all in your head…err…well, maybe it is.
8. People do not express jealousy through a single emotion or a single behavior. They instead express jealousy through diverse emotions and behaviors, which makes it difficult to form a scientific definition of jealousy. Scientists instead define jealousy in their own words.

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