Interesting And Surprising Facts About Subdural Hematomas: Protect Your Brain At All Cost!

The hematoma is mostly defined as a pool of blood outside the blood vessels. Most frequently, hematomas occur as a result of an injury to the wall of a specific blood vessel, forcing blood to seep out of that blood vessel to the surrounding tissues. This condition can occur from an injury to any blood vessel (vein, artery, or small capillary). A hematoma commonly describes bleeding that has less or more clotted blood while a hemorrhage indicates active and ongoing bleeding.

The hematoma is mostly defined as a pool of blood outside the blood vessels. Most frequently, hematomas occur as a result of an injury to the wall of a specific blood vessel, forcing blood to seep out of that blood vessel to the surrounding tissues. This condition can occur from an injury to any blood vessel (vein, artery, or small capillary). A hematoma commonly describes bleeding that has less or more clotted blood while a hemorrhage indicates active and ongoing bleeding.
A hematoma is a common problem which several people encounter at some point in their lives. It can be seen under the nails or skin as purplish bruises of various sizes. Also, skin bruises can be referred to as contusions. Hematomas can also occur deep inside the body where they may not be seen.
Many hematomas resolve suddenly over some period as the blood debris is successfully removed and the blood vessel wall is fixed by the repair mechanisms of the body. Other periods, evacuating or removing the blood in the hematoma becomes very necessary depending on its location or symptoms.
A subdural hematoma happens when a blood vessel close to the brain’s surface bursts. Blood accumulate between the brain and the tough outer layer of the brain. The condition is also called a subdural hemorrhage.
In a subdural hematoma, blood collects instantly under the Dura mater. The Dura mater is the outermost coating of the meninges. The meninges is a three-layer protective layer of the brain. A subdural hematoma is known to be a life-threatening problem since it can easily compress the brain.
Many subdural hemorrhages commonly result from trauma to the head. Also, the trauma damages small veins within the meninges.
In young, healthy persons, bleeding often is triggered by a considerable impact. This kind of impact might happen in a high-speed car accident. In contrast, older persons may bleed after only a slight trauma. For instance, it might occur from falling out of the chair. A Subdural hematoma is often caused by a head injury, like from an assault, motor vehicle collision, or a fall. The unexpected blow to the head tears blood vessels which run along the brain surface. This is known as an acute subdural hematoma.
Persons with a bleeding disorder and those who take blood thinners are very likely to develop the subdural hematoma. A relatively slight head injury can result in a subdural hematoma in individuals with the bleeding tendency.
In a severe subdural hematoma, tiny veins on the outer layer of the brain may tear, resulting in bleeding in the subdural space. Symptoms may not be clear for many days or weeks. Senior citizens are at greater risk for chronic subdural hematoma since brain shrinkage causes these small veins to be more stretched and thus vulnerable to tearing.
A subdural hematoma is also very common in persons:
a) Taking medications which thin the blood.
b) Who’ve seizures.
c) Who abuse alcohol.
An acute subdural hemorrhage refers to the bleeding which develops shortly after a severe blow to the head. Blood accumulates quickly, causing pressure to increase within the brain. This can result in paralysis loss of consciousness, or even death.
When bleeding develops quickly, it’s referred to as a chronic subdural hemorrhage. Bleeding may occur over a period of weeks to months.
This kind of bleeding is very common in older people. The head trauma which causes chronic subdural hemorrhage is usually minor. Most of those affected can’t remember the head injury.
Below are five quick, interesting facts about subdural hematoma:
1. An acute subdural hematoma is generally associated with extensive crucial brain injury. In one study, 82 percent of comatose patients with acute subdural hematomas had parenchymal contusions.
2. Presentation differs broadly in the acute subdural hematoma. Most of these patients are comatose during admission. Nonetheless, about 50 percent of patients with the head injuries who need emergency neurosurgery present with the head injuries which are considered as mild or moderate. Most of these patients suffer from intracranial mass lesions.
3. Another name of Subdural Hematoma is a subdural hemorrhage.
4. If you feel ‘drunk’ without any alcohol intake, most probably that blood in your brain is clotting. Simply known as Subdural Hematoma.
5. Distortion of motion, speech, view and sensation are the common manifestations. Numbness, vomiting, and fatigue are also primary manifestations.
6. Simple Preventive tip of Subdural Hematoma – It’s very simple! Protect your brain at all cost!

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