Interesting Facts About Tutankhamun: The Youngest Pharaoh To Rule Over Egypt

The Egyptian way of burying their dead and preserving their memories, have been fascinating since times immemorial. Tutankhamun or King Tut is one of the most famous Egyptian Pharaohs, probably because archaeologists discovered his tomb. His original name, Tutankhaten means “living image of Aton,” while Tutankhamun means “living image of Amun.”
Since then, his remains have held people across the world in awe over the mystery surrounding his life and death. Before the spectacular discovery of his intact tomb in November 1922, Tutankhamun was a little-known figure.
Tutankhamun or King Tut is one of the most famous Egyptian Pharaohs, probably because archaeologists discovered his tomb. Since then, his remains have held people across the world in awe over the mystery surrounding his life and death. Before the spectacular discovery of his intact tomb in November 1922, Tutankhamun was a little-known figure.
His reign was marked by the return to normalcy in the socio-religious plane after the interlude starring the monotheism of Akhenaten. Tutankhamun was between 8 and 9 years old when his reign began. Therefore, the important decisions of government fell to two older figures: the father of Nefertiti, named Ay, and a military general named Horemheb. The Boy Pharaoh ruled for a decade, from 1333 to 1324 B.C. He is considered the youngest Pharaoh to rule over Egypt.
Here are 8 interesting facts you probably didn’t know about Tutankhamun:
1. The tomb was smaller than many Pharaoh’s tombs. This is perhaps due to Tutankhamun’s sudden death, meaning there was no time for an elaborate tomb.
2. The body of Tutankhamun was buried in a wooden coffin covered with gold and placed inside a huge granite sarcophagus. The coffin was made from 110 kg of solid gold.
3. He married one of his half sisters. It is believed that Tutankhamun has married one of his half-sisters. Akhenaten, Tutankhamun’s father, was married to Nefertiti, with whom he had six daughters.
Akhenaten also had a second wife, named Kira, who is said to be the mother of Tutankhamun. It is said that Tutankhamun married Ankhesenpaaten, one of the six daughters of Nefertiti and Akhenaten. Confused? So are we!
4. There is no evidence of how Tutankhamun met his death. An x-ray done on the mummy found fragments of bones in Tutankhamun’s skull, giving way to a theory that the young king was bludgeoned to death. But more recently, the experts concluded the damage to the skull might have occurred after the death, or at the hands of the crew or during the embalming process.
5. Tutankhamun loved to hunt ostriches. His ostrich-feather fan was discovered lying in his burial chamber, close by the king’s body. Originally the fan consisted of a long golden handle topped by a semi-circular ‘palm’ that supported 42 alternating brown and white feathers.
These feathers crumbled away long ago, but their story is preserved in writing on the fan handle. This tells us that that the feathers were taken from ostriches captured by the king himself while hunting in the desert to the east of Heliopolis (near modern-day Cairo).
The embossed scene on the palm shows, on one face, Tutankhamun setting off in his chariot to hunt ostrich, and on the reverse, the king returning in triumph with his prey.
Ostriches were important birds in ancient Egypt, and their feathers and eggs were prized as luxury items. Hunting ostriches was a royal sport that allowed the king to demonstrate his control over nature. It was a substitute for battle and, as such, was a dangerous occupation.
6. His trumpets have entertained an audience of more than 150 million. Tutankhamun’s grave goods included a small collection of musical instruments: one pair of ivory clappers, two sistra (rattles) and two trumpets, one made from silver with a gold mouthpiece and the other made of bronze partially overlaid by gold.
This would not have made a very satisfactory orchestra, and it seems that music was not high on Tutankhamun’s list of priorities for his afterlife. In fact, his trumpets should more be classified properly as military equipment, while his clappers and sistra are likely to have had a ritual purpose.

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