Interesting Facts About Blood: There’s Gold In Your Blood!

Blood

Blood

Most of us usually tend to think about on our blood when we donate, get a paper cut, or even find ourselves at a hospital. The truth is there is a lot more to the essential life-sustaining fluid which drips into a Band-Aid, a testing tube, or intravenous (IV) line.
Without blood, our bodies wouldn’t receive the adequate amount of oxygen and fuel to reach the hundreds of millions of cells all essential for good health.
In the United States, there is someone who needs blood every two seconds. At least 41,000 blood donations are required daily. According to the American Red Cross, a total of thirty million blood components are transfused every year in the United States.
Blood is crucial for our existence since it carries oxygen, fuel and other essential chemicals required in the body while also facilitating the elimination of waste products from different parts of the body. Thus, it is imperative to learn some little-known facts about this life-sustaining fluid which ensure the functionality of our body system.
Blood is the life-giving fluid which delivers nutrients to various body cells. It’s a specialized kind of connective tissue which comprise of white blood cells, platelets, and red blood cells suspended in a plasma matrix.
Did you know that your blood contains small amounts of gold or that blood accounts for almost 8% of your body weight? We would like to share with you more surprising facts about blood. Below are interesting facts you probably didn’t know about blood.
1. Your blood type has an effect your personality. In fact, this has been known for quite some time in the Asian medicine. People with Type A blood tend to be kind and compassionate. They put the needs of other people before their own. Type B blood is typically found in individuals who are emotionally flexible, outgoing and friendly.
People with Type AB blood tend to be strong and rational, with less worry. On the other hand, those with Type O blood tend to worry a lot and are so organized and practical.
2. Not all blood is red. Whereas human beings have red colored blood, other organisms have the blood of different colors. Spiders, crustaceans, octopuses, squid and some arthropods have blue blood.
Certain species of marine worms have violet blood. On the other hand, some types of leeches and worms have green blood. Insects, including butterflies and beetles, have pale-yellowish or colorless blood.
The type of respiratory pigment used to transport oxygen through the circulatory system to the body cells determines blood color. In humans, the respiratory pigment is a protein known as hemoglobin found in red blood cells.
3. White blood cells are essential for pregnancy. It’s well-known that white blood cells are vital for a healthy immune system. What many people don’t know is that some white blood cells known as macrophages are required for pregnancy to happen.
Macrophages are predominant in reproductive system tissues. Macrophages help in the growth of blood vessel networks in the ovary, which is significant for the production of the progesterone hormone.
Progesterone plays a key role in the implantation of an embryo in the uterus. Small macrophage numbers cause low levels of progesterone and weak embryo implantation.
4. After needing thirteen liters of blood for surgery at the age of 13, James Harrison promised to donate blood once he turned 18. Doctors discovered that his blood had an unusual antigen that cured Rhesus disease. So far, he has donated blood a record 1,000 times and help to save over 2,000,000 lives.
5. There is gold in your blood. Human blood contains metals atoms including lead, chromium, iron, manganese, copper, and zinc. You may also be surprised to learn that blood contains small amounts of gold. The human body has nearly 0.2 milligrams of gold that’s usually found in the blood.
6. Pregnant women have almost fifty percent more blood by week 20 of their pregnancy than they did before they conceived. During pregnancy, the blood volume of a woman increases by 50% to provide additional support the uterus, along with the blood amount pumped by the heart. This extra amount is required to deliver blood to the placenta and uterus. By the end of pregnancy, the uterus of a woman will receive one-fifth of her pre-pregnancy blood supply.

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