Interesting Facts About Fear: You Don’t Need To Be In Danger To Be Scared

Fear

Fear

Fear keeps us alive. Our brains have specialized neurons, centers, tricks and genes which primarily scares the pants off you for that adrenaline wallop to enhances your chances of surviving a particular threat.
This article will focus on some of the little-known facts regarding how fear is triggered, caught, and how it can kill an individual it’s trying to save.
As a human being, chances are you’ve experienced fear at some point in your life. Our bodies are built for optimum survival, and fear is a crucial gatekeeper. It breeds vigilance, suspicion, and caution; thus, keeping us safe and secure by making us wary of a potential threat which might come our way.
Fear can be crippling and uncomfortable. However, getting rid of it would be the equal to taking down the alarm system of your home since it sometimes makes very loud and annoying sounds.
Being fearless does not mean removing fear. You should know how to leverage fear to be fearless. To do that, you should be aware a few things about what you’re dealing with. So, here are five interesting facts about fear.
1. It is inheritable. Researchers trained lab mice to associate cherry blossom aroma with an electrical shock. Their pups and even grand-pups were then all wary of the cherry blossom, although they never got any electric shocks when exposed to the smell.
Their great caution might have something to do with the epigenetics. This mechanism alters the genetic code, activating specific genes or turning off others based on the experience of the individual or the environment.
The two generations later after the flower-fearing parents, all had changed their brains. Large parts were devoted to recognizing the smell, perhaps to assist them to prevent what their ancestors considered as a threat.
2. Fear determines the actions you would take. Actions triggered by fear fall into four types—fright, flight, fight, or freeze. Freeze means you stop what you’re doing and concentrate on the fearful stimulus to make a decision on the next step to take (e.g., you come across a memo that your employer will be laying off individuals).
Next, you decide either flight or fight. You choose whether to work around it (start searching for a new job) or confront the threat directly (tell your employer why you should not be laid off). If the fear is overwhelming, then you will experience fright: You neither flee nor fight; in fact, you’ll do nothing—well, you obsess about the layoffs, complain, ruminate, but you can’t take any action. Being always in fright mode can cause depression and hopelessness.
3. You do not have to be in danger to be scared. Fear is also part imagined. So, it can develop without something scary. In fact, since our brains are very efficient, we start to fear a range of stimuli which aren’t scary (conditioned fear) or not even existing at that moment (anticipatory anxiety).
We get scared due to what we imagine could occur. Some neuroscientists suggest that human beings are the most fearful creatures on the Earth due to our ability to think, learn, and even develop fear in their minds. However, this inferior and objectless fear can end up being chronic anxiety about nothing in particular, and become debilitating.
4. Fear comes in several shades. It’s an inherently hostile experience which can range from mild to severe—from expecting the results of your medical examination, to receiving news of a fatal terrorist attack.
Shocking events can set a permanent mark on the circuitry of your brain that may call for professional assistance. But, chronic stress, the low-intensity type of fear expressed as daily insecurity, constant worry, and free-floating anxiety, can quietly but severely harm your mental and physical health over time.
5. The more real the potential threat is, the more heroic your actions. People react differently to imagined and real threats. Imagined threats can lead to paralysis.
Being scared about horrifying things which may or may not occur in the future makes you very nervous but take little action. Intense fear strikes you. You’re overwhelmed but don’t know what to do.
On the other hand, real threats cause a frenzy. When a threat is looming and recognizable, you act instantly without flinching. This explains why people are more likely to alter their habits after a severe health scare (such as a heart attack) than after only reading statistics about the detrimental effect of the diet depending on fried foods. If you plan to rally your troops, you need to put yourself in danger.

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